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day a meteorite makes impact with earth in russia. what's really going on here? i came to nasa goddard to find out and get some real answers. >> today the day of an amazing cosmic coincidence. >> the close call happened earlier this afternoon. an astroid called 2012 da14 whizzed pasted earth at about 17 thousands miles per hour. nasa scientists believe da14 was once part of the astroid belt between mars and jupiter and is a remnant of our ancient solar system. the astroid passed under the orbit of some of our weather satellites. it's captivated attention of people at goddard and around the world. we had about 17,000 miles of breathing room from its closest point above the indian ocean and it was about 2,000 miles or so from the nearest satellite orbiting earth. >> space is a really big place, so it's still mostly empty. >> reporter: the approach of da14 may be news to us, but nasa has known about it for a year. it's the meteor that slammed into russia earlier this morning that took them completely by surprise. it's a calculated risk nasa took when they first started studying outer spa
planet. it happened in the past hour, nasa said the meteorite in russia had nothing to do with the asteroid, about the size of half a football field. joining me, astronomer david dundee. the question is, as i have just answered, there was nothing to do with the two of them one is more common than the other. meteorites in the sky of russia coming down. how rare is that? >> well, meteorite impacts happen all the time. the earth picks up tons of debris every day but it's usually in the form of dust and smaller objects. one the size of what we saw in russia is a once in a decade thing. last time this happened was about ten years ago, over in the pakistan, india region of the world. but the two objects are totally unrelated and one of the other big things to consider is that you're separating the two events by 14 hours. remember, the earth is hurling around the sun at 19 miles per second so we're in a different neighborhood than weapon the meet -- when the meteor came in in russia. >> that's interesting. everything's moving at once. how fast was this thing going? >> the top sea
overnight. a nasa scientist explains how it could arrive unexpectedly. >>> the not so triumphant return of a >>> welcome back at 6:15. that disabled cruise that became a nightmare for passengers sits empty in mobile, alabama. a long trip homemade longer with problems towing the boat to shore. jay gray is also in mobile this morning where that ship is docked. jay, good morning to you. i cannot imagine the relief those passengers are feeling today. >> reporter: absolutely, eun. good to talk to you this morning. relief. it started with a lot excitement. adrenaline as the ship was pulled into the port here. take a look. not a much better picture than this had. an empty and idle carnival triumph. loud roars, applauses. not only from the ground but from those on the deck. they began chanting let us off. let us off. they were systematically removed from this ship. a process that initially carnival told us would take four to five hours. they finished in just over three hours. even with just one working elevator on the ship. a lot of the passengers, over 100 reunited with family members and frie
of them hurt by falling glass. nasa saying the meteor was about 50 feet and impact may have been 30 times stronger than the atomic bomb that hit hiroshima. drivers are searching a frozen lake, this one near where it landed. 20,000 searchers looking for remains of the meteor but so far they haven't found any. >> kelly: we have to check this out. an amazing video, an unrelated asteroid flying past earth, this one was much bigger and could have been more dangerous. it doesn't look so bad within safe within our atmosphere but this nasa of an makes shows the path of 150 foot asteroid. it came within 17,000 miles of earth's surface and something so large has come to our planet. scientists have been keeping a very close eye on this one, but there are a lot -- they have never seen them coming this big. >> heather: here to add to that, a mysterious sighting, this one even closer to home. reports of a bright light flashing through the sky, this was in northern california. >> kelly: look at that. >> heather: you can see flying by on the right hand corner of your screen, witnesses saying it looked li
town on the same day as nasa saying an asteroid is going to fly by earth. are the two connected? we'll tell you coming up. >> and shots ring out in a wild chase through the streets of san francisco. the crash ending involving a town car and a taxicab. mom, i invited justin over for lunch. good. no, not good. he's a vegetarian and he's going to be here in 20 minutes! [ mom ] don't stress. we can figure this out. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] get the speed to make a great first impression. call today to get u-verse high speed internet for as little as $14.95 a month for 12 months with a one-year price guarantee. this is delicious. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] save the day in an instant. at&t. ♪ ♪ [ telephone rings ] good evening this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. >>> hundreds hurt when a meteor slams into russia. >> the size of a house. >> it was a sunrise of biblical proportions, a sky full of fire and brimstone. >> home at last, passengers from that crippled cruise ship final
to make a close fly by of planet earth. but nasa says there's no chance the 150-foot astroid will hit us. at the closest point it will be 17,000 miles from earth, and that's closer than weather and tv satellites that are in orbit. we're giving you mixed messages there. we're saying it's not far, but it's closer than weather and tv satellites. okay. greg was in here, and i was happy to hear his explanation of things. >> he says we don't have to worry about it. in the meantime, do we have to worry about the weather? here's tucker barnes with the answer. >>> potentially so. thank you very much. not this morning. lots of sunshine. cool start to the day. later this afternoon, rain showers move in for the evening commute and might transition to snow later tonight. a lot going on weather-wise. 37 now at reagan national. 34 this morning dulles. bwi marshall 33 degrees. make sure the kids are bundled up. we're not concerned with rain and/or snow the first half of the day. satellite radar, generally sunny skies the first half of your day. clouds will quickly increase. late this afternoon, see the
roblin is talking with local nasa scientists about the asteroid and he will have more coming up tonight on 11 news at 5:00 and six o'clock. >> we are talking about things up in the air, but this is closer to the surface and not as dramatic. we have a new weather system coming in and it promises to be a snow and rain producer. temperatures are definitely warm enough for rain. made-50 cost right now. 20 of sunshine. west virginia is seen rain shower activity. that will be moving east. probably not until the end of the afternoon or early evening hours. what will it do as far as snow is concerned? i will have more on that forecast coming up. >> the deadline to apply for john leopold's job ended about three minutes ago, and a number of local politicians are throwing their name in the ring. acting county executive john hammond is interested in filling in. other candidates include steven schuh, county counsel chair jerry walker, vice chair john grasso, thomas angelis, and former maryland first lady kendel ehrlich. the county council will interview the candidates vote on february 21. john leopo
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
there are a million such objects out there. nasa is doing a very good job cataloging all the ones they can, but so far they've been able to find just about 10,000 of them. so we're a little ways away from having the complete inventory. >> schieffer: well, let me just ask you this question-- is there something the government ought to be doing or science ought to be doing that it's not doing? >> actually, believe it or not we are handling this one well. in 1995, nasa authorized-- or rather, congress authorized nasa to scan the skies 24 hours a at day, seven days a week, to look for these objects and we're doing it at three observatories in california, new mexico, and puerto rico. and those three observatories have accounted for about 98% of the bodies we know are out there. now, there are ways to defend ourselves once we know it's out there. and we have the technology to do it. it's just a question of putting the money together and deciding to do that. >> schieffer: all right well, that is a little bit reassuring, and thank you very much for helping us on something that most of us know absolutely nothin
this afternoon around 2:25 eastern. nasa didn't know about the astroid until a year ago when an amateur astronomer just happened to spot it in our skies. but it seems a remote part of russia did get a visitor from space. at least one meteorite streaked across the sky this morning triggering powerful shockwaves. witnesses say the noise set off car alarms and broke windows and damaged a factory. at least 250 people were hurt, mostly cuts from broken glass. thousands of russian troops were put on alert. >> apparently according to the latest information we have, 20,000 first responders are being sent to the scene, three aircraft surveying the damage from the scene. again, all those folks injured from the broken glass of all the stuff that shattered during the collision. >> and it's cold there, so the people with shattered windows are in the freezing cold. so a lot going on. >>> now let's check our weather. mountain snow in the central rockies. showers from tennessee to southern illinois. heavy rain from orlando southward. snow around the great lakes and northern new england. >>> mostly 50s
. this is a serious thing right? people say why doesn't nasa do something about it, and there are cool old political reasons. first of all, it wasn't part of nasa's charter it wasn't human space flight or science it's just cataloging objects that are scientifically understood, blah blah blah blah. we work hard to raise awareness of this, and so oh, we are maybe getting there. cenk: how much money do you think is needed to catalog it? >> it's a great question. there's two things we do wrong as c.e.o. of a non-profit. we don't ask for money and then we don't ask for enough. cenk: so fix it right now. don't be like a down sore, fix it. >> we can approach the problem in two ways, first to get the sentinel spacecraft flying, that's about $450 million. then between now and when that could possibly happen, it's about that much money and then after that, to go deflect one it's about that much money. cenk: we're talking about a billion. >> 1.5 billion. it's what the curious city rover cost. we might find something on mars that might dare i say it, change the world. cenk: bush said let's go drill on mars, it'
'm not a professor but -- >> i'm not actually an expert, so it's okay. how do we miss that? >> the thing is, nasa really is tracking thousands of objects that are objects of interest near earth asteroids. this thing was small and frankly the direction it was coming from was towards the sun. so we didn't see it. sometimes we spot things just days before they pass by. and some things we track for years in advance. >> so this we just barely -- or unfairly, we missed. we could miss other stuff. should we pour money into equipment or technology that would see more of that stuff, however small? i'm all for putting money into nasa. it's half a percent of our budget. only a small fraction of that goes towards this, monitoring the earth's asteroids. it might be important in the long run. but like i said, they do track some things for years. there's many things that we're aware of. but the solar system is not eight planets, there are millions of objects making up the solar system. >> you say you're not a professor, you come off as a very good one. thank you very much. i appreciate it. >> thanks. >> neil: i
's surprising is nasa didn't even see it. we'll tell you why, coming up next right here on "world news now." >>> "world news now" weather brought to you by consumer cellular. have given way to sleeping. tossing and turning where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. then find out how to get lunesta for as low as fifteen doll
them. so nasa is very good the at finding the much larger ones. but these smaller ones we as humans have not put a lot of effort into it. at the planetary society, we have people that are interested in it and we found this one. >> i want to bring in jason carroll, at the new york museum of natural history. tell us what you're learn building this huge astroid that will get very close to us today. >> well, let me give you some perspective. this meteorite is just about roughly the size of a car, i would say. da-14 which will be swinging by the earth later on this afternoon is about half the size of a football field. so much, much, much larger. and it will be traveling at a rate of about 17,450 miles per hour. that's something like 4.8 miles per second. so it's traveling at an incredible rate. weighs much larger than the meteorite you see behind me here. it will pass by at it closest point about 2:24 p.m. eastern standard time. if you're in indonesia, that is your best vantage point to see. it will be dark there at that particular time. but if you have a telescope, you should be able to
of the meteorite's powerful landing. right now nasa is keeping close watch over an asteroid as it hurdles about 17,000 miles above the earth's surface. a record-setting approach near our planet and apparently it's under 50 feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part o
as an asteroid that came exceedingly close to earth, at least in space terms. as this nasa animation shows, the asteroid was just over 17,000 miles away from earth, traveling at about eight miles per second, actually inside a ring of television and weather satellites that surround the planet. named da-14, the asteroid was half the size of a football field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in t
the kind of objects that nasa cannot predict ahead of time. they're too small to actually track. the as asteroid that's passing the earth later this afternoon is an object that nasa can pick up ahead of time and can track. by the way, the two events are not related in any way. it's just a chance circumstance that both of these happened on the same day. >> okay. well, let's talk more about this asteroid. as we said, we know that's coming. so every ten years we can expect this sort of thing that happened over russia to happen somewhere in the world and there's not much we can do about it? >> no. there's no way really to predict objects that small coming into the earth atmosphere. tellus museum here is part of the network of nasa set up with fireball cameras. we have several in the southeast. and a few in the west. and this is part of a project, an effort, to track bright meteors. and we track about 8 to 12 bright meteors every night over cartersville. but when we link it with other cameras, we can tell how fast, how high, and even plot where in the solar system these smaller objec
. >> if you thought flying fighter jets was exhilaratinexh, he was about to take off in another gear. >> nasa a looking for the next batch of the astronauts. >> specifically african-americans, what did you think your chances were. >> i didn't think my chances were very high. >> with nearly 10,000 applicants competing for just 35 flights, his chances were slim, but guy was one of three african-american astronauts, made it through. so, what kind of personality makes it into space? >> well, you have to be a person that can get along with a the lot of different people, but you also have to be a team player. >> were you anxious? >> i was excited about flying so i think we were well portrayed. interestingly enough when you rocket into space, it's almost like riding a simulator. the simulations are so good in the ground almost like you've been there before. >> harris: now you find out your mission has been moved up and you're actually going to be the first african-american in space. what goes through your mind? >> well, i was just excited about flying. but i also recognized the importance of the rol
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
. and the meteorite that crashed into russia, why nasa thought it was bigger and badder than we first thought. >> a flash of light. >> just says after a huge meteorite explodes over russia injuring more than a thousand people there's word of another big fireball, this one streaking above california. trace gallagher live on the west coast with more, trace? >> reporter: they tell us that meteors are rare, but they're whipping around us. this person was driving 280 one of the areas around the bay area, a bright flash of blue light streak across. it's kind of hard to see the color on the video, but witnesses say this thing was a very bright blue and maybe it's just because of what happened in russia that we're watching the skies a little closer, but experts say this likely also could have been a meteor or a meteorite, but there were no reports of it exploding and no reports of it hitting anything, unlike in russia where this thing happened on friday and now, nasa is saying that it was bigger, faster and stronger than they thought instead of 50 feet, it was 55 feet. instead of 33,000 miles per ho
the size of a 15 story building. sun light will obscure the event but nasa will stream the fly by at 11:00 p.m. >>> valentine's day in san francisco always means one thing a huge pillow fight. it is just getting started and ktvu's mike mibach right there in the middle of all of it. >> reporter: it is the calm before the storm of the great pillow fight on valentine's day here in san francisco. it takes place right here in justin herman plaza. the official kickoff is around 6:00 p.m. they will hear the bells ringing and as soon as they hear the bells go it is game on as folks will start slugging away with their pillose. quit the selection. white, brown, pink. lot of costumes as well. talk about your experience. >> first timer. >> what brings you out? >> this is my friend. i am going to find my female tonight. >> reporter: why? >> facebook. she was talking about it today and i wasn't doing anything for valentine's day because i am single. >> reporter: do you have a technique? >> yeah. hold two hands and bring it across. >> reporter: you will have fun. is it chet? >> yeah. >> costume? >> i
know. there might be a television satellite that happens to wonder into it path. although nasa has calculated we don't think it will happen. >> reporter: the asteroid is supposed to come by earth at 11:25 a.m. pacific time. it's not supposed come by here until 7:00 tonight. the next time this asteroid will come close to earth is 2046. it's not visible to the naked eye. but if you want to check it out the chabot space and science center will be open tonight. >>> time is 5:02. over night news san francisco police are investigating a frightening incident involving a stolen car. there was a chase, a crash, and gunfire. ktvu tara moriarty is here to tell us the chase ended with a multicar crash right on a busy downtown section. tara. >> reporter: it took quite awhile for the reconstruction team to figure out how this accident happened. it was pretty complex. you can see behind me even though the scene has be cleared it's still messy with medical supplies and oil and tire marks on the road. just before 10:00 last night someone stole a black town car. >> there was surveillance until they
should watch for fraud. nasa experts say about hundred tons of space debris hit the earth every day but most of the objects are tiny specks. >>> you can take everything you knew about the moon and forget it. scientists have made a stunning discovery. they analyzed monday rocks that the apollo astronauts retrieved and they said the moon had more water than scientists first realized. that could mean the moon was not created by a debris by a planetary collision. how did it form? they north sure. at the very least, it raises many questions. full study is in the journal nature geo science which you probably have their on the night stand. >> whiskey drink ers don't want anybody watering down their booze. the folks at maker's mark learned it the hard way. plus, a high stakes heist in manhattan. how robbers rode off with a fortune in the blink of an eye. "i'm only human" ] humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you q
on march 1. these are brutal cuts to defense, head start, food safety, mental health service, nasa, and small business assistance, and disaster relief. that's just to name a few. the list goes on and on. with the looming deadline. and every american depending on congress to come up with a plan. here is what the republicans did today. congressional members. congressional members took a half day and left capitol hill this afternoon and said we're out of here. congress is in recess for the next ten days and will not address the budget crisis until february 25th. every house democrat and four republicans voted against the recess, and it was obvious leader nancy pelosi was frustrated when a reporter asked just how much more is she willing to compromise. >> i appreciate your question and the good faith in which it has been offered. the republicans are poised to shut down government. the republicans are poised to elect sequestration go forward, which is -- sequestration, you know what that word means? what it means to the american people is unemployment. no jobs. republican party in the c
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it passes very close to earth on friday, mid-day. it's going to pass within about 17,200 miles of earth. that's a lot closer than the moon is to the earth. it's also within the satellite ring. about 5,000 miles within the ring of satellites that hover above the earth's surface. what can we really expect from that asteroid has it passes close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites
the second. >> the project pre sently received 5 million in funding from nasa. one in russia insisted it was not a meteor, but john considerry a new weapons of mass destruction from texas in the united states. one of president obama's favorite spots to grab a bit. ray's hell burger, reportedly owes overdue rent and court fees and a second location closed for business and president obama has visited the spot with vice-president biden and russian president med investiga med did he ha med-- >> and how does he stay so-- >> those restaurants are popular in northern virginia, it's hard to believe. >> clayton: have you even at ray's hell burger. >> tucker: i don't, but the traffic. always packed. >> clayton: and how do you have $39,000 in back rent to pay? if they're lining out the door. let's talk about a new census bureau study revealing what it means to be middle class. certainly obviously during the campaign we hear the term middle class, both sides playing to try to the middle class. the president during his state of the union used middle class eight times, but what does it mean? here i
in the tracking? >> the good thing is that nasa and other agencies have been diligent about tracking this asteroid for some time now, so they have very good data on what the orbital pass of this is, and they can tell within a very few hundred feet or so, maybe a few hundred miles, how close this is to earth, and they know for sure that it won't come any closer than 17,150. that's pretty good. it's great they do that because they can look at other potentials like this too. >> we can be that accurate about its size and its pass of the earth, but let's get to this $200 billion number about what its cost would be worth. how do we get to that number? how do we put a price tag on this asteroid? >> well, you know, we could look at the composition ofas resides and figure out what their value is according to their mineral worth. if we could actually mine them and, of course, that's another story altogether, but when we think about the kind of minerals that we find there, some of them very rare ones that we need here on earth or that we use quite extentively here on earth, and we have somewhat limited suppl
close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites? could it threaten the satellites out there? >> it is coming within the ring of tv satellites, but it's fairly far away from the majority, the beehive of satellites close to the earth, so we think that hitting a satellite is a very rare oprtunity. we don't think this will happen. >> all right, paul. good luck monitoring it and we'll be watching it closely. what paul and the others here tell us is you're not going to be able to see this with the naked eye. you'll need a telescope, at least in the northern hemisphere to see this and you'll have to wait until after sunset on friday because the asteroid will be moving away from earth at a very rapid rate of speet. they'll be using that tracking antenna to get a visual of the asteroid and measure its depth and its length. they only know
russia and nasa is at this minute tracking an asteroid that is set to fly by earth in about five minutes. the closest to earth. about five minutes from now. join our conversation on twitter. you can find out @tamronhall and my team is at @newsnation. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)